Plantar Fasciitis

posted on 10 Mar 2014 22:02 by upsetapex9552

So what causes the Plantar Fascia to become inflamed? There are a number of various reasons for this to occur. For example, you are more likely to develop Plantar Fasciitis, if you are over 50 years old, if you're overweight, or pregnant, or if you have a job that requires a lot of walking or standing on hard surfaces. You're also at risk if you do a lot of walking or running for exercise (overuse injury). And if you have tight calf muscles (which a lot of people have) you're also more likely to develop Plantar Fasciitis.

The pain from plantar fasciitis is described as being dull, aching or sharp (all three for me) and can usually be reproduced by flexing the toes upwards and tensing the fascia. Plantar fasciitis also tends to worsen after standing or exercising for prolonged periods or after getting out of bed in the morning. Morning heel pain from plantar fasciitis is one of the most common symptoms and occurs because the fascia becomes tense after a protracted rest. As the person walks, the fascia "warms up" and lengthens slightly, reducing the tension on the ligament and lessening pain.

Stretching is a very simple treatment - everyone can do it everywhere, no equipment is needed and no effort. Yet it is a very powerful plantar fasciitis treatment technique. There are many scientific medical research evidence that shown significant heel pain relief for groups that used to stretch on a regular basis. Make yourself a habit to stretch at least twice a day using two or more of the above exercises (no need for all of them) and your painful foot disorder will be gone much faster. A good stretching routine is a very strong base for a plantar fasciitis treatment plan.

There are many factors that can lead to an occurrence or re-occurrence of plantar fasciitis. Although plantar fasciitis can influence mechanical malfunctions of the foot during movement, as already mentioned, these malfunctions can also cause plantar fasciitis. Having flat feet, for example, is a common condition where the arch of the foot drops. The result is abnormal wear and tear on the plantar fascia that can lead to a damaged fascia. Pronation, high arches, and a tight Achilles tendon are also biomechanical factors that can add stress and pull the plantar fascia too much, causing tears in the tissue.

A good exercise that you can perform before sitting up is to stretch your foot by moving it up and down ten times. An alternative exercise you should do while sitting is to roll a rolling pin or tennis ball with the arch of your foot. Once you can, move on to doing this exercise as you are standing up. After these exercises, put on your shoes with arch support inserts inside them, or wear supportive sandals. Don’t start the day walking without shoes on hard floors or tiles, or it can be guaranteed that your heel pain will come back.plantar fasciitis

To make a custom splint, a therapist, podiatrist or physician molds a hard plastic splint to each patient's leg and foot. The splint covers the posterior part of the leg and the sole of the foot. It is fastened around the leg and foot by Velcro straps. The splints can be made to control abnormal foot motion since they are fit closely to the leg with minimal or no padding. Because each splint is unique, they can cost more than a commercial off-the-shelf splint. The splints are not designed for walking.

Make an appointment with a podiatrist, a doctor who specializes in foot problems. While you are waiting to see your podiatrist, avoid standing and walking for long periods and do not run or engage in sports or carry heavy objects. Prepare an ice pack by placing crushed ice inside a plastic bag and wrapping a towel around the bag. Rest your feet on the ice pack for 15 to 20 minutes once or twice each day. Take nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs daily. Wear running shoes with inside padding and good heel support instead of your regular shoes. Noninvasive Treatments

To carry out this stretch, stand with your weight on your left foot and place your right heel on a table or bench at or near waist height. Face straight forward with your upper body and keep both legs nearly straight. As you stand with your right heel on the table and your left foot on the ground, rotate your left foot outward (to the left) approximately 45 degrees, keeping your body weight on the full surface of your left foot (both heel and toes are in contact with the ground). You are now ready to begin the stretch.

Treatment of this condition after proper diagnosis from a foot and ankle surgeon usually begins with rest and avoiding any physical activities that might aggravate the plantar fasciitis Icing 20 minutes several times a day also helps reduce the inflammation associated with the condition. Also, it is important to avoid going barefoot. This puts excessive stain on the plantar fascia. Stretching exercises are also critical. Stretching helps not only to stretch the calf muscles but also stretches the plantar fascia to help reduce pain and help with the recovery. Medications are also useful in the treatment process.

For immediate pain relief, your podiatric physician can give you a cortisone injection. There are many conservative treatments for plantar fasciitis that when used accordingly are very successful. You should be icing and stretching the bottom of your foot daily. Your podiatric physician may refer you to a physical therapist to aid in your treatment and to teach you the most effective stretching techniques for your foot type and condition. You may also be advised to wear a night splint that stretches your tendons and fascia in your foot while you sleep. These treatments can significantly reduce the inflammation of your plantar fascia and thus reduce your pain. plantar fasciitis shoes

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